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Theatre Development Fund

Playing All of Shakespeare’s Women (At Once) Tina Packer navigates “Women of Will”
“Consider the challenge in just the first part of the marathon: Packer and costar Nigel Gore tackle The Comedy of Errors, Richard III, Titus Andronicus, Romeo and Juliet, and all three parts of Henry IV. In between, they analyze the role of women within each play, studying Shakespeare’s early treatment of the fairer sex.”
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NY Daily News

“Wall-to-Wall William Shakespeare”
“Spring blooms with wall-to-wall Will Shakespeare on stages and bookshelves.”
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Examiner.com

“Shakespeare & Co’s ‘Women of Will’ Commands Attention in New York Debut ”
“After thrilling New York audiences with the Overview for the past two months, Packer and company will now offer ‘The Complete Journey,’ the complete edition of all five Parts over a period of three days, starting this Friday, April 5. The plays follow Shakespeare chronologically from his earliest works, as Packer outlines his growth and development as a playwright, as well as changing preoccupation with the role of women in his plays, who play ever more powerful roles, for good or ill, in his work.”
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Wall Street Journal

“Brilliant! Fearlessly impassioned acting that you’ll remember for as long as you live.”
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Vimeo

“NY1 “On Stage” Video Interview with Tina and Nigel ”
“Shakespeare began off not as a feminist at all. He was projecting on women they’re either viragos or they’re sweet little virgins on the pedestal. You know, he was a kid, he was projecting on women but he really didn’t understand women, but by the time he got to the end of his life he was saying, ‘Guys, if we don’t follow the women, if we don’t run our lives the way women run their lives, we’re going to be in real trouble.’ I think he ended up as a real feminist.”
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Offbroadwayworld.com

“Moderated Talk-Back Tuesdays to Kick Off at WOMEN OF WILL Off-Broadway, 3/19”
“Tina Packer’s Women of Will is her groundbreaking exploration of Shakespeare’s canon through the eyes of his female characters”
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WBAI Radio

“Tina Packer talks about her play Women of Will to WBAI host Janet Coleman – original air date, 3-25-13”
“Tina Packer discusses her rendition of Women of Will on 99.5fm Pacifica Radio”
Listen at yourlisten.com
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Art Info

“Q&A With Actor Tina Packer: Shakespeare and Freud, Female Power, and Manti Te’o”
“I believe that Shakespeare saw how deeply unfair society was to women and he increasingly wanted to reveal that. I don’t know if he played women’s parts as an actor, but he really got it.”
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Works by Women

“Interview: Tina Packer”
“But then I started realizing that Shakespeare was using the women to stand up for what is true in the world, whether it’s about the love between a man and a woman, or somebody like Ophelia, who runs mad to tell the truth…And so I feel as if Shakespeare himself started identifying more with the women and less with the soldiers who were going to do ‘honorable deeds’ and fix the problem just by beating somebody else. You can notice as the plays go on, there are fewer and fewer outright fights after Henry V and the women become real players whether to undo the fights or just to have their say.”
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Columbia Spectator

“’Women of Will’ offers non-traditional take on Shakespeare’s strong women”
“The word ‘will’ takes on multiple meanings in one of this season’s most hyped-shows. Conceptualized by, written by, and starring chameleon Tina Packer, ‘Women of Will: The Overview’ takes the stories of some of the strongest-willed women in William Shakespeare’s works. The play… is part lecture and part play, with added-on bits of slapstick comedy and social commentary.”
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